Saskatchewan Review!

Our first kitchen destination has been a great success! I’m still enjoying the leftovers of the cake, the wheat cakes, the bannock and the krootoñ di pwer.

Everything here was so good that I can definitely see myself making all of these again. However, I think my favorites were pierogies, the confetti bars, the Jello fruit cocktail cake, the bannock, and the krootoñ di pwer. The confetti bars and Jello fruit cocktail cake are the least healthy, so I’ll make these only for special occasions. The cake would be awesome for summer. I might also modify the recipe and post an inspired recipe or two here based on what I think might taste even better and what could be healthier.

As for the bannock, it was super easy to make and it reminds me of growing up having biscuits, butter and jam for breakfast with my grandparents, except there’s no hydrogenated oils in it when I make it at home. I’d love to try different variations of bannock going forward.

Continue Reading…

Pierogies and Sausages

pierogiesAfter trying the lazy pierogies, I decided to try my hand at making actual pierogies.

I read several recipes and ended up making one very similar to this one. Since
I’d used cheddar for the pierogie casserole, I wanted to try a different flavor. Many recipes, including this one, call for farmer’s cheese, which I couldn’t find in my area. Some suggest using ricotta cheese to replace farmer’s cheese, so I tried it.

The first time, admittedly, was difficult. The recipe called for lightly flouring the rolling pin and cutting board, but the dough was the stickiest I’d ever worked with. Eventually, I ended up pouring a substantial amount of flour on everything—my hands, the board, the rolling pin, and the dough itself, just to keep it from sticking. That worked well, and once I started seeing those neat, floury dough circles, it felt really good.

Continue Reading…

Blueberry Crumble (inspired by Lil Krutooñ di Pwer)

Blueberry Crumble (inspired by Lil Krutooñ di Pwer)

This recipe is inspired by lil krutooñ di pwer, or the Saskatoon crumble. It’s a dessert from the Métis Nation, which is a group of the descendants of the Cree and the early French settlers and explorers.

I found the link to this Métis cookbook just in time before it was time to move on to Australia. The recipe is on page 76.

Continue Reading…

Jello Fruit Cocktail Cake

cake

I have to admit that before reading about this, I’d never heard of anything like it. The only thing that comes close is a recipe from a vintage cookbook from the 60s. I’d always thought it was a fad and that people had decided against it. Are memories really made of this as /u/isle_say  says? If that’s true, it must be pretty good. Only one way to find out!

Continue Reading…

Bannock

Bannock

This was super fun and easy to make. This would be perfect to recreate in a classroom or with students or scouts in the kitchen or at camp!

Kneading this dough is easy and the dough is easy to handle. It comes out just like a freshly baked scone. I topped mine with blueberry jam and butter.

Continue Reading…

Wheat Cakes

Wheat Cakes

Let’s revisit the confetti bar post, in which I had said that /u/Ocarina_21 on Reddit said:

That sort of square thing with variously coloured marshmallows and I think peanut butter. It’s at all sorts of Saskatchewan events, but I don’t think I’ve ever been told what it’s called. And then if you’re a masochist, there’s that vile “puffed wheat cake” 

As you know, the confetti bars were absolutely amazing. I was curious about this puffed wheat cake—I researched a bit and found that people seemed to have very mixed feelings with regards to it. Some love it and some hate it, but some people who like it still can’t really forgive their mom for trying to pass off grains as dessert.

Continue Reading…

Confetti Bars

Confetti Bars

 

In my book, the local treats everyone always prepares count for even more than dishes that originate in the region but that no one really makes.

The suggestion was made for me to use Reddit to crowdsource ideas. I hadn’t used it much before, but I’m glad I started. There’s a certain thrill in knowing you’re actually communicating with the real people who are experts in your topic of interest—in this case, Saskatchewan food.

Under /r/saskatchewan, I submitted “Saskatchewan Recipes,” under which I asked: What are some recipes or foods from Saskatchewan?

/u/Ocarina_21, replied:

That sort of square thing with variously coloured marshmallows and I think peanut butter. It’s at all sorts of Saskatchewan events, but I don’t think I’ve ever been told what it’s called. And then if you’re a masochist, there’s that vile “puffed wheat cake” 

I went on a quest to hunt down the name of this recipe. I Googled “recipe marshmallows peanut butter saskatchewan” and this was the first result with Saskatchewan in it: 

Marie, the author, says this about the recipe: 

Anyway, confetti bars. Haven’t had em in a long time, and have noticed that they definitely aren’t the ubiquitous party/ holiday treat here, that they are back home. You can’t go to a Canadian potluck, Christmas dinner, or wedding social without coming across these things! I’m not taking any credit for the recipe itself, as it’s one that you just learn as a kid, and absolutely everyone knows.

And then, in the comments, were more testaments to the Canadian-ness of the treat, including this one from Heather:

Definitely a Canadian thing. Grew up in Saskatchewan, where they were always to be found wherever people brought baking, but it’s been harder than I thought to find a recipe, and the only recipes I’ve found have been on Canadian sites (is it a prairies thing?)

I was sold. I went out to the store in search of colored marshmallows and butterscotch chips.

Continue Reading…

Lazy Pierogies

perogicaasserole

 

If you’re learning about Saskatchewan, before long, you’ll find that pierogies are a thing. My first attempt at investigating the regional culture took me to Youtube. I found a video from a guy who was explaining the hand signals drivers use in Saskatchewan, and how to just the right kind of wave—”you don’t want to overdo it,” he said, “or we’ll know you’re an outsider.” It was pretty cool that even drivers seem to have a vague sense of camaraderie.

Below that, I found a link to a video called “Things Saskatchewan people NEVER say.” Of course, I clicked, hoping to find Sask truths. Recurring themes involved how cold it can get and how much snow falls, how important hockey is, pils (pilsner), pierogies, and cabbage rolls.

Knowing this, I began my look into the world of Saskatchewan pierogie making.

Continue Reading…

Hello, World!

Hello, World! I’m so excited to begin this project with you. I hope you enjoy following along! Let’s get started…

About

bwfacecircle

Join me as I generate random coordinates on the planet and attempt to learn to cook those regions' cuisines.

 Read more.

Live at home like a traveler.
—Henry David Thoreau

Subscribe

...and never miss a new recipe!